Skip to main content
  • Share:
The Dark Sky Region in NSW is home to Australia‚Äôs most important visible-light Observatory at Siding Spring, located on the edge of the Warrumbungle National Park. 

View the Dark Sky Planning Guideline

 

The Observatory has more than 20 telescopes and is one of the few in the world that can view the whole Southern Hemisphere sky.

 dark-sky-sepp-southern-cross-834x745

 

The Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000 (Regulation) require a consent authority to consider the Dark Sky Planning Guideline for development covered by local environmental plans for Coonamble, Dubbo, Gilgandra and Warrumbungle.

 

 dark-sky-sepp-dark-sky-region-834x437

The Regulation also requires:

  • a consent authority to consider the  Guideline  for regional development, State significant development and designated development within 200 km of the Observatory
  • a proponent to consider the Guideline when preparing an environmental impact statement for State significant infrastructure; and
  • a certifying authority to ensure that lights installed in a development comply with certain standards when issuing an occupation certificate for a dwelling house, dual occupancy or secondary dwelling that is complying development on land in areas of Coonamble, Dubbo, Gilgandra and Warrumbungle.

 

dark-sky-sepp-local-planning-controls-834x582

 

These measures will limit the amount of light pollution generated by new development in order to protect the observing conditions at the Siding Spring Observatory.

 


For more information about the Siding Spring Observatory, visit: http://rsaa.anu.edu.au/observatories/siding-spring-observatory



Page last updated: 05/07/2016