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NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment
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The NSW Government will work with each council to deliver the directions and actions set out in this plan. 

 

Priorities for each council are set out in the following section and will guide further investigations and implementation. 

 

The priorities build on the directions and actions in this plan to achieve outcomes on the ground. Planning will encourage infrastructure delivery that targets the needs of its communities. It will also encourage efficiencies in the allocation of resources and investment to improve the liveability and sustainability of the region. 

 

The narratives identify:

  • housing and employment projections; 
  • strategic intent, opportunities and regionally significant priorities;
  • locations for growth for dwellings; and
  • jobs and communities of regional significance.

The NSW Government will assist councils to translate these into local plans.

Hunter region context map

Click to enlarge.

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Lower Hunter is composed of Cessnock, Lake Macquarie, Maitland, Newcastle and Port Stephens local government areas.

 

Cessnock

Cessnock
Population
2016 56,100
2036 (Projected) 69,250
Projected Increase +13,150
Dwellings
2016 24,000
2036 (Projected) +6,350
Projected Increase +6,350
Employment
2016 18,905
2036 (Projected) 25,497
Projected Increase +6,592

Cessnock Local Government Area is the focal point for the region’s wine industry and a significant tourism destination and entertainment node. Opportunities exist to increase its appeal as a major wine and food tourist destination with a national and international reputation. The recent completion of the Hunter Expressway has improved connectivity to the Greater Newcastle and Upper Hunter area, increasing its attraction for housing and employment. Investigation of infill opportunities and new housing is required in the longer term.

 

Regional Priorities

  • Support the visitor and agricultural economies by conducting a land use assessment across the Viticulture Critical Industry Cluster.
  • Investigate the region-shaping potential of the Hunter Expressway.
  • Continue delivery of the Branxton Subregional Plan.
  • Protect regionally significant transport corridors, including the Newcastle Freight Rail Bypass.
  • Plan for, and deliver regional cycleway links along the Richmond Vale Rail Trail.

 

Centres and Employment

Regionally significant centres and employment land clusters:

  • Strategic centres: Cessnock, Kurri Kurri
  • Centres of local significance: Branxton and Huntlee
  • Critical Industry Clusters: Pokolbin viticulture area.

 

Priorities for strategic centres:

Cessnock

  • Retain an administrative, retail and service function for the Local Government Area.
  • Investigate opportunities to leverage the heritage character of the centre, and growth in wine tourism in Pokolbin.
  • Provide additional housing in the adjoining town.
  • Implement the Cessnock CBD master plan.

 

Kurri Kurri

  • Retain a retail and service function for surrounding communities.
  • Leverage its proximity to the Hunter Expressway and existing significant industrial land.
  • Investigate opportunities for urban renewal of the town centre and new housing opportunities.
  • Develop and implement a master plan for Kurri Kurri CBD.

 

Housing

Future housing and urban renewal opportunities:

  • Deliver existing Urban Release Areas at Bellbird North, Nulkaba, Huntlee, Greta (Anvil Creek), West Street Greta, Golden Bear, Vintage Balance, Mount View Road, Rose Hill, Cliftleigh and Avery’s Village.
  • Develop the Kurri Kurri Corridor.

 

Port Stephens

Port Stephens
Population
2016 74,100
2036 (Projected) 92,650
Projected Increase +18,550
Dwellings
2016 36,900
2036 (Projected) 47,950
Projected Increase +11,050
Employment
2016 28,809
2036 (Projected) 34,475
Projected Increase +5,665

Port Stephens Local Government Area contains a mix of rural land, towns, villages and coastal areas (largely focused along the Tomaree Peninsula) that are a major recreational, tourist and retirement destination. The regionally significant Newcastle Airport provides capacity to support growth in defence and aerospace-related industries.

 

Regional priorities

  • Protect the functioning of the Newcastle Airport and support its growth.
  • Leverage proximity to major global gateways – and its attractive and valuable natural environment and coastal and rural communities – to generate economic growth and diversity.

 

Centres and employment

Regionally significant centres and employment land clusters:

  • Global Gateways: Newcastle Airport
  • Strategic centres: Raymond Terrace and Nelson Bay
  • Centres of local significance: Salamander Bay, Anna Bay, Medowie, Karuah, Tanilba Bay, Lemon Tree Passage, Fern Bay, Hinton, Woodville and Seaham.
  • Significant employment land clusters: Tomago and Heatherbrae.

 

Priorities for strategic centres:

Raymond Terrace

  • Support its role as the main service centre in the Local Government Area, and in providing a range of facilities for surrounding communities, including retailing, government, civic and professional services.
  • Investigate increasing social, transport and economic connections to surrounding communities and centres across the Greater Newcastle area.

 

Nelson Bay

  • Maintain it as one of the primary tourist centres for the region and a hub for the Tomaree Peninsula.
  • Maintain retail and professional services for the surrounding communities.
  • Investigate opportunities for high-density development that maintains and enhances the tourist, recreational and residential appeal of the centre.
  • Balance the mix of permanent residential and tourist accommodation to enhance the vibrancy and appeal of the centre and surrounds.

 

Newcastle Airport

  • Support the ongoing operations of the Royal Australian Air Force Base at Williamtown.
  • Investigate opportunities to cluster defence and aerospace-related research, manufacturing and businesses around the airport.
  • Expand passenger services (including international flights) by increasing connections domestically and with the Asia-Pacific.
  • Manage growth and respond to the natural and cultural values in the area and to mitigate the impacts of drainage and flooding.
  • Increase access to the airport from the M1 Pacific Motorway and Newcastle to increase its competitiveness as a passenger and business destination for the Hunter and surrounds

 

Housing

Future housing and urban renewal opportunities:

  • Deliver existing Urban Release Areas at Fern Bay, Medowie and Kings Hill (future).
  • Investigate and deliver infill potential within the strategic centres of Raymond Terrace and Nelson Bay.

 

Lake Macquarie

Lake Macquarie
Population
2016 202,350
2036 (Projected) 226,800
Projected Increase +24,450
Dwellings
2016 87,700
2036 (Projected) 101,400
Projected Increase +13,700
Employment
2016 66,860
2036 (Projected) 78,60
Projected Increase +11,741

Lake Macquarie Local Government Area includes the southern portion of the Greater Newcastle metropolitan area. It is the largest city in the Lower Hunter by population. The area’s picturesque landscape and convenient connections to other parts of the Hunter, Central Coast and Sydney attract residents and visitors to the area. There is a mix of centres, including Charlestown, Glendale and Morisset, and also housing opportunities, many in scenic locations. Lake Macquarie will continue to attract new residents because of these attributes.

 

Regional priorities

  • Revitalise existing suburbs and explore opportunities for new infill and greenfield release areas.
  • Develop Charlestown, Cardiff–Glendale and Morisset into well-connected strategic centres.

 

Centres and employment

Regionally significant centres and employment land clusters:

  • Strategic centres: Charlestown, Morisset, Cardiff–Glendale (emerging)
  • Significant employment land cluster: Cardiff Industrial Estate
  • Centres of local significance: Belmont, Toronto, Cardiff, Warners Bay, Swansea and Mount Hutton.

 

Priorities for strategic centres:

Charlestown

  • Support the development of Charlestown with further higher–density residential development and employment diversity to enable it to better function as a city centre with a range of commercial and government services, and housing.
  • Retain and increase regionally significant retail and higher-order community facilities.
  • Improve public transport connections to other strategic centres.
  • Implement the Charlestown Town Centre Area Plan.
  • Continue investigations into the economic diversification of the centre, increasing residential densities through redevelopment and public transport access, and improving public amenity and access to open space.

 

Morisset

  • Grow the centre to accommodate a range of land uses, including business, residential and open spaces, close to the railway station.
  • Provide services for the areas identified for urban growth, supported by established infrastructure and services.
  • Implement Morisset Town Centre Area Plan.
  • Investigate options to improve traffic flow through the centre.

 

Cardiff–Glendale

  • Plan for development as an emerging strategic centre that will provide services to the growing Newcastle – Lake Macquarie, Western Corridor, deliver renewal in Cardiff and redevelop the former industrial lands at Boolaroo.
  • Implement the Glendale Regional Centre Area Plan.
  • Provide support for the Lake Macquarie Transport Interchange and associated roadworks.
  • Develop Glendale as a strategic gateway to Greater Newcastle.
  • Leverage the existing good access to employment and services in the metropolitan area and commuter connections to the Upper Hunter Valley and Central Coast.

 

Housing

Future housing and urban renewal opportunities:

  • Deliver existing Urban Release Areas at Cooranbong, Wyee, Morisset, Cameron Park, Edgeworth, Catherine Hill Bay and West Wallsend.
  • Support the development of Warners Bay, Toronto and Belmont into higher density, compact mixed-use centres.
  • Implement Town Centre Area Plans for Warners Bay and Belmont.
  • Investigate the potential of a Glendale–Cardiff Renewal Corridor, including opportunities for linkages/extension to Boolaroo and Speers Point.
  • Investigate the extension to the Pacific Highway Corridor (Gateshead to Belmont).
  • Continue to plan for the Glendale–Edgeworth Corridor for longer-term growth.
  • Deliver and maximise the potential of urban infill opportunities at the Pasminco redevelopment area in Boolaroo.

 

Maitland

Maitland
Population
2016 78,200
2036 (Projected) 104,850
Projected Increase +26,650
Dwellings
2016 31,650
2036 (Projected) 44,200
Projected Increase +12,550
Employment
2016 28,311
2036 (Projected) 34,790
Projected Increase +6,476

Maitland Local Government Area contains a high-growth metropolitan area that includes strategic centres servicing the hinterland and rural areas of Dungog and the Upper Hunter area. It includes a number of urban release areas that are contributing to significant greenfield housing supply for the region, as well as centres undergoing revitalisation, and historic rural villages. Maitland will continue to supply housing, connect its settlements and offer civic, health and educational services.

 

Regional priorities

  • Deliver housing in the Maitland Corridor.
  • Investigate the region-shaping potential of the Hunter Expressway.
  • Grow Central Maitland as an emerging regional city centre.

 

Centres and employment

  • Regionally significant centres and employment land clusters:
  • Strategic centres: Central Maitland and East Maitland
  • Significant employment land clusters: Thornton and Rutherford
  • Centres of local significance: Lochinvar (emerging), Thornton and Rutherford.

 

Priorities for strategic centres:

Central Maitland

  • Develop Maitland as a strategic centre that services the western sector of Greater Newcastle, one of the fastest growing areas in the State.
  • Leverage recent renewal activities to increase its ability to attract additional retail and commercial activity.
  • Implement the Central Maitland Structure Plan.
  • Explore opportunities to improve the public domain and access to the Hunter River.
  • Support increases in residential development that addresses flood risk.
  • Support flood mitigation infrastructure and initiatives to increase the resilience of existing properties against flood risk.

 

East Maitland

  • Investigate opportunities to develop a health cluster that leverages the NSW Government commitment to build a new Maitland Hospital.
  • Diversify the economy and employment opportunities in the area.
  • Investigate the potential of East Maitland and adjacent Green Hills and Metford areas to increase economic and population growth.

 

Housing

Strong population growth in the Maitland Local Government Area is resulting in ongoing pressures for additional residential land and a shortfall in infrastructure provision. There are significant challenges to servicing a number of development fronts and increasing dwelling density near centres, transport nodes and in areas of high amenity. The growth in housing needs to be balanced against the natural constraints of flooding and the agricultural value of the floodplain and other rural lands.


Future housing and urban renewal opportunities:

  • Deliver the existing Urban Release Areas of Anambah, Aberglasslyn, Gillieston Heights, Bolwarra/Largs, Lochinvar, Thornton North, Louth Park and Farley.
  • Investigate growth and renewal corridors along main roads in existing urban areas, such as the New England Highway.

 

Newcastle

Newcastle
Population
2016 165,050
2036 (Projected) 198,350
Projected Increase +33,300
Dwellings
2016 75,450
2036 (Projected) 92,250
Projected Increase +16,800
Employment
2016 111,299
2036 (Projected) 129,263
Projected Increase +17,964

This is the city at the centre of Greater Newcastle, the largest regional centre in NSW and the economic, service and administrative centre for the region. Newcastle provides the most diverse mix of specialised services in the Hunter region, and significant employment and residential development, and associated infrastructure.

 

Regional priorities

  • Provide a buffer to the Port of Newcastle operations through appropriate zoning to safeguard its future.
  • Continue the revitalisation of Newcastle City Centre.
  • Reinforce established renewal corridors by encouraging densities that support further improvements to the public transport network.
  • Provide small-scale renewal and redevelopment of larger sites for infill housing.

 

Centres and employment

Regionally significant centres and employment land clusters:

  • Global Gateways: Port of Newcastle
  • Strategic centres: Newcastle City Centre, John Hunter Hospital, Callaghan and Kotara, Broadmeadow (emerging)
  • Centres of local significance: Waratah, Hunter TAFE at Tighes Hill, Wallsend, The Junction, Jesmond, Hamilton and Mayfield.

 

Priorities for strategic centres:

Newcastle City Centre

  • Continue revitalisation to create an exciting place that attracts people, business and investment, domestically and from across the Asia-Pacific.
  • Strengthen connections between the city and the waterfront and improve civic spaces.
  • Monitor commercial floor space to assist with planning for growth in service industries and the projected increase in jobs from 25,000 to 33,000 in the next 20 years.
  • Support upgrades to tourism infrastructure to enable increased visitation (by sea and air), to expand on the more than 1 million people that currently visit Newcastle each year.
  • Plan for the expansion of the University of Newcastle and support initiatives to develop the city centre as a hub for innovation.
  • Monitor residential development activity to assist with planning for 6,000 new dwellings.
  • Deliver the Newcastle Light Rail from Wickham to Pacific Park to provide frequent, reliable and comfortable travel through the city centre.
  • Deliver the new transport interchange at Wickham that will integrate trains, buses, taxis and light rail, as well as pathways for cyclists and car drop-off and pick-up points. This is an important gateway into the city centre and is the backbone of future extensions of the transport network.
  • Focus investment in infrastructure to alleviate pinch points that will deliver large-scale renewal projects such as site amalgamation and remediation costs. The NSW Government will lead by example, and partner with others to deliver landmark infrastructure projects.

 

Broadmeadow Sport and Entertainment Precinct

  • Investigate the potential for renewal in the Broadmeadow precinct, given its location at the geographic centre of inner Newcastle and at the intersection of the inner city’s major thoroughfares and rail corridor.
  • Enhance public transport access to Newcastle City Centre, the John Hunter Hospital and other strategic centres.
  • Diversify the range of services on offer and expand the large recreation and entertainment focus as industrial and manufacturing activities relocate.
  • Implement existing renewal strategies along Tudor Street corridor, and consider a review of densities to ensure that a range of public transport improvements are viable. The review should
  • investigate extending the renewal area and achieve better integration between Nineways, Broadmeadow and the sport and entertainment precinct.
  • Continue the investment and precinct planning (by the NSW Government) for the Broadmeadow sporting and entertainment precinct and the Broadmeadow rail station.

 

John Hunter Hospital

  • Support the development of a health cluster that provides world-class education, health and research services.
  • Support expanded community health and wellbeing services, as well as industry sustainability and innovation activities.

 

Callaghan Education Precinct

  • Continue to provide world-class education and research services.
  • Support the development of an innovation cluster.

 

Kotara

  • Continue to provide regionally significant retail, and support growth and diversification of other employment and economic activities.
  • Investigate opportunities for medium- to high-density housing within (as shop top housing) or close to the centre, in areas not constrained by flooding.
  • Enhance public transport access to other strategic centres in Greater Newcastle.

 

Housing

Future housing and urban renewal opportunities:

  • Deliver housing and employment in the following existing renewal centres, precincts and corridors: Newcastle City Centre; Wickham–Hamilton–Broadmeadow (Tudor Road Corridor);
  • Broadmeadow–Adamstown (Bunker Road Corridor); and Wickham–Islington–Mayfield (Maitland Road Corridor).
  • Deliver housing in Urban Release Areas in the Newcastle–Lake Macquarie Western Corridor.
  • Investigate new renewal opportunities in centres including The Junction, Georgetown/Waratah, Adamstown, Lambton, New Lambton and Kotara.
  • Investigate and prioritise additional renewal corridors for longer-term growth that supports public transport improvements, including for Newcastle–The Junction–Merewether (Darby Street Corridor); Broadmeadow–New Lambton/Lambton; and Adamstown and Kotara.

 

Upper Hunter is composed of Muswellbrook, Singleton and Upper Hunter local government areas.

 

Muswellbrook

Muswellbrook
Population
2016 17,150
2036 (Projected) 20,300
Projected Increase +3,150
Dwellings
2016 7,400
2036 (Projected) 9,000
Projected Increase +1,600
Employment
2016 11,364
2036 (Projected) 13,551
Projected Increase +2,187

 

Muswellbrook Local Government Area is located in the centre of the Upper Hunter Valley and is the predominant location for the State’s power generation. It is also a key location for coal mining activities and an important agricultural area. Muswellbrook is well placed to enhance its role as an administrative centre and a centre of educational excellence in the Upper Hunter. Muswellbrook will have to balance an overabundance of resources and successful secondary agricultural industries.

 

Regional priorities

  • Conduct an assessment of land use compatibility.
  • Undertake a land use assessment of the Viticulture Critical Industry Clusters to align planning controls to achieve a balance between scenic amenity and ongoing growth in tourism.
  • Support diversification of the energy and agricultural sectors.
  • Protect the Equine Critical Industry Cluster and allow for expansion of the industry.

 

Centres and employment

Regionally significant centres and employment land clusters:

  • Strategic centres: Muswellbrook
  • Centres of local significance: Denman and Sandy Hollow.

 

Priorities for strategic centres:

Muswellbrook

  • Maintain its regional centre role in providing educational, administrative, government, retail and commercial functions for the Upper Hunter.
  • Continue to provide business support services to the mining and power generation industries.
  • Finalise and implement the Town Centre Strategy to guide future development in Muswellbrook Central Business District, including plans for a purpose-built civic services precinct.
  • Support the development of Muswellbrook as a centre of educational excellence.

 

Housing

Future housing and urban renewal opportunities:

  • Deliver existing Urban Release Areas at Denman and Muswellbrook.
  • Manage demand for rural residential development with the potential for longer term demand for residential development, and balance both in the context of potential mining activity surrounding Muswellbrook.
  • Diversify housing opportunities to respond to changing demographics and housing affordability.

 

Singleton

Singleton
Population
2016 24,700
2036 (Projected) 28,600
Projected Increase +3,900
Dwellings
2016 10,200
2036 (Projected) 12,200
Projected Increase +2,000
Employment
2016 17,249
2036 (Projected) 20,482
Projected Increase +3,233

 

The Singleton Local Government Area forms part of the transition between the Upper and Lower Hunter. There are a number of important interchanges between State and regional roads, including the Hunter Expressway, New England Highway, Golden Highway and Putty Road, all of which intersect in the Local Government Area. Magnificent natural areas, such as Lake St Claire and parts of the Greater Blue Mountains and Gondwana Rainforest World Heritage areas, provide significant conservation and tourism opportunities. The future of Singleton lies in growing and diversifying its industry base (including primary industries), improving its housing product mix and minimising land use conflict. The mainstays of the economy are coal mining, agriculture (with growth in viticulture and related tourism), manufacturing and retail.

 

Regional priorities

  • Deliver the Branxton Subregional Plan.
  • Investigate the region-shaping potential of the Hunter Expressway.
  • Support tourism and agriculture by conducting a land use assessment across the Viticulture Critical Industry Cluster to align planning controls that balance scenic amenity with ongoing growth in tourism.
  • Conduct and assessment of land use compatibility.
  • Support the visitor economy by enhancing viticultural and nature-based tourism and associated infrastructure.
  • Manage productive landscapes that sustain important agricultural sectors.

 

Centres and employment

Regionally significant centres and employment land clusters:

  • Strategic centres: Singleton
  • Significant employment land clusters: Mount Thorley Industrial Area
  • Centres of local significance: Huntlee, Broke, Camberwell, Jerrys Plains and Branxton.

 

Priorities for strategic centres:

Singleton

  • Maintain its role providing administrative, retail, commercial, education and health services.
  • Leverage recent renewal activities to increase its ability to attract additional retail and commercial activity.
  • Improve connectivity to major transport corridors.
  • Implement measures to manage flooding impacts.
  • Protect and revitalise items of heritage significance.

 

Housing

Future housing and urban renewal opportunities:

  • Deliver existing Urban Release Areas at Singleton Heights, Gowrie, Huntlee and Branxton.
  • Explore redevelopment opportunities to provide medium-density housing areas in suitable locations in the Singleton Town Centre Railway Precinct.

 

Upper Hunter Shire

Upper Hunter
Population
2016 14,700
2036 (Projected) 16,200
Projected Increase +1,500
Dwellings
2016 7,050
2036 (Projected) 8,100
Projected Increase +1,050
Employment
2016 5,948
2036 (Projected) 7,143
Projected Increase +1,195

 

The Upper Hunter Local Government Area is predominantly rural and forms part of the western area of the region. It includes the Upper Hunter equine precinct and major beef cattle production, as well as manufacturing industries. It is part of the Upper Hunter Mining and Electricity Generation Precinct. Employment is concentrated in the agricultural sector, particularly in Merriwa and Murrurundi.

 

Regional priorities

  • Protect the Equine Critical Industry Cluster and allow for expansion of the industry.
  • Protect Biophysical Strategic Agricultural Lands and other important agricultural lands.
  • Support the tourism economy by investigating ways to leverage agriculture and equine industry strengths to attract food-based and equine-related visitors.
  • Support the diversification of the energy sector and ongoing extractive industries, noting that the Upper Hunter Local Government Area is part of the Upper Hunter Green Energy Precinct.
  • Encourage the establishment of employment–generating rural industries, value-adding industries and intensive agriculture in appropriate locations.

 

Centres and employment

Regionally significant centres and employment land clusters:

  • Strategic centres: Scone
  • Centres of local significance: Aberdeen, Merriwa and Murrurundi
  • Significant agricultural employment clusters: Equine Critical Industry Cluster.

 

Priorities for strategic centres:

Scone

  • Maintain its role as a commercial and administrative centre for the Upper Hunter with key facilities and services including a railway station, Scone Hospital, TAFE, Courthouse and local council administration building.
  • Support development of Scone as the nationally recognised ‘Horse Capital of Australia’.
  • Maintain support services for the agricultural and equine industries, including veterinary and meat processing facilities, and livestock sales.

 

Housing

Future housing and urban renewal opportunities:

  • Deliver existing Urban Release Areas at Scone Heights, Kurrajong Estate, St Aubins Estate, Aberdeen Heights Estate, Oxley View Estate (Merriwa) and Rosedale Estate (Murrurundi).

 

MidCoast is composed of MidCoast and Dungog local government areas. 

MidCoast

MidCoast
Population
2016
91,250
2036 (Projected)
96,250
Projected Increase
+5,000
Dwellings
2016
49,750
2036 (Projected) 54,750
Projected Increase +5,000
Employment
2016 30,936
2036 (Projected) 36,873
Projected Increase +5,937

The MidCoast Local Government Area, in the northern part of the Hunter, features pristine waterways, an extensive network of national parks and World Heritage wilderness areas. It is a popular destination for residents and visitors. The economy and employment are largely service-based, with industries such as tourism being highly seasonal. It contains diverse agricultural activities, including poultry, dairy and beef, and significant oyster-producing areas. The new MidCoast Council will have to consider the needs of diverse communities within a regional setting. It will have to capitalise on the opportunities provided by urban centres, rural areas and the natural environment to form a thriving economy based on food production, tourism, manufacturing and services that meet the needs of an ageing and growing population.

Regional priorities

  • Support the visitor economy by leveraging the natural beauty of the area and enhancing nature-based tourism infrastructure. 
  • Protect productive landscapes that sustain the poultry, dairy and beef industries. 
  • Manage development within sensitive water catchments and protect environments that sustain the oyster industry. 
  • Provide capacity for long-term employment through education and training, and by capitalising on intra- and inter-regional connections. 
  • Provide housing, services and facilities, as well as accessible public spaces for an ageing population.

Centres and employment 

Regionally significant centres and employment land clusters:

  • Strategic centres: Forster–Tuncurry, Taree 
  • Centres of local significance: Gloucester, Old Bar, Wingham, Tea Gardens–Hawks Nest, Harrington, Diamond Beach, Bulahdelah, Nabiac, Hallidays Point and Stroud. 

Priorities for strategic centres: 

Taree

  • Enhance retail, health, education, cultural, civic and recreational activities. 
  • Maintain the retail and commercial role of the CBD, centred on Victoria Street. 
  • Support the Manning Rural Referral Hospital by developing a health precinct cluster. 
  • Develop opportunities to cluster appropriate economic activities around the Taree Airport and Pacific Highway interchanges (Northern Gateway and Manning River Drive) that support the ongoing commercial and retail role of Taree CBD. 
  • Support the continuing role of manufacturing. 
  • Encourage greater utilisation of the Manning River for tourism, recreational and commercial purposes. 

Forster–Tuncurry 

  • Maintain retail, education, civic and tourism activities. 
  • Manage the role of tourism and accommodation. 
  • Protect environmental and natural attributes. 
  • Consolidate commercial activities in existing precincts.
  • Enhance the services and facilities to support the ageing population.

Housing

Future housing and urban renewal opportunities:

  • Deliver existing Urban Release Areas at Fig Trees on the Manning, Brimbin, Hallidays Point, Old Bar, Manning River Drive Business Park (employment), Tea Gardens and South Forster.
  • Manage environmental values and residential growth in North Tuncurry.
  • Investigate renewal and infill housing opportunities in Taree, Forster–Tuncurry, Old Bar and Tea Gardens–Hawks Nest that respond to changing demographics. 

Dungog

Dungog
Population
2016
8,750
2036 (Projected)
8,950 
Projected Increase
+200
Dwellings
2016
4,150
2036 (Projected) 4,550
Projected Increase +400
Employment
2016 2,635
2036 (Projected) 3,176
Project Increase +541

Dungog Local Government Area is bordered by the World Heritage-listed Barrington Tops plateau to the north, with strong connections to Maitland and Port Stephens to the south. It contains the local service centres of Dungog, Clarence Town and Paterson, and is characterised by important agricultural and water catchment areas. Dungog’s future lies in strengthening its tourist connection to Barrington Tops, diversifying its already-strong agricultural base and capitalising on its potential for large-scale music festivals.

Regional priorities 

  • Support the growth and diversification of the agricultural sector.
  • Expand the tourism sector by leveraging its strengths, including growing of fresh produce and nature tourism.
  • Protect the water supply. 

Centres and employment 

Regionally significant centres and employment land clusters:

  • Centres of local significance: Dungog, Clarence Town, East Gresford, Gresford, Paterson and Vacy.

Housing 

Future housing and urban renewal opportunities: 

  • Cater to the housing needs of ‘tree changers’ and the ageing population.
  • Balance the demand for rural residential lifestyle housing with agricultural and environmental attributes.

Page last updated: 09/08/2018