NSW Department of Planning and Environment

The Infrastructure SEPP (State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007) sets out the planning rules and controls for infrastructure in NSW. The SEPP simplifies the planning process for providing essential infrastructure like hospitals, roads, railways, emergency services, water supply and electricity delivery.

The Infrastructure SEPP assists the NSW Government, private infrastructure providers, local councils and communities and plays a key role in helping to deliver the NSW Government’s infrastructure works.

On exhibition

The department regularly reviews and updates the Infrastructure SEPP to make sure the planning rules support improvements to infrastructure in NSW. As part of these ongoing improvements, the following change to the Infrastructure SEPP is currently on exhibition:

Changes to protect fuel pipelines

The department is proposing changes to better protect fuel pipelines from new development. The changes will strengthen measures to manage potential risks earlier in the planning process. Fuel pipelines transport essential materials, such as natural gas and fuel, that keep our communities running. It’s important that we protect them and the communities around them.

The proposed changes would apply to developments which increase the number of people in the area near pipelines, such as aged care, childcare centres and hospitals.

The explanation of intended effect (EIE) (PDF, 156 KB) outlining the proposed changes and the Draft Pipeline Guidelines are on exhibition until 5pm 18 May 2022.

Visit the Planning Portal for more information and to have your say.

Under consideration

All feedback received during the exhibition period is considered and informs the department’s final decision on the proposed changes.

The following proposed changes to the Infrastructure SEPP are currently under consideration:

Infrastructure and Education SEPP amendments

The Education SEPP (ESEPP) works alongside the ISEPP to make it easier for child-care providers, schools, TAFEs and Universities to build new facilities and improve existing ones. The following changes to the ISEPP and ESEPP are proposed and will be exhibited together in two parts:

Part A. Transport definitions and assessment

The proposed changes will update terms and planning rules relating to the delivery of transport infrastructure such as roads, railways and ports. This will help to ensure projects get the right level of assessment and allow impact projects to be delivered more quickly and at a reduced cost.

The changes will also protect Sydney Metro West, by restricting unsuitable development along the proposed route.

Part B. Streamlining assessment of infrastructure

The proposed changes will update terms and planning rules for a wide range of infrastructure projects including hospitals, schools, energy, water, transport and telecommunications. This will ensure the Infrastructure SEPP and Education SEPP are more consistent, so similar activities are assessed in the same way. It will also make sure projects get the right level of assessment, allowing low impact projects to be delivered more quickly and at a reduced cost.

The explanation of intended effect (EIE) (PDF, 801 KB) was on exhibition from 15 December 2021 until 11 February 2022.

Visit the Planning Portal for more information.

New rules to help farmers

The department proposed changes to allow farmers to to restore streams on their property through landscape rehydration techniques, without the need for council approval.

The explanation of intended effect (EIE) (PDF, 136 KB) outlining the proposed changes and the Landscape Rehydration Infrastructure Guide (PDF, 394 KB) were on exhibition from 20 December 2021 until 28 February 2022.

Visit the Planning Portal for more information.

Fast-track access to installing household batteries

We are proposing to make it easier for households to install household batteries without the need for planning approval. This change will save people time and money and will contribute to helping the environment with renewable energy sources.

The explanation of intended effect (EIE) (PDF, 496 KB) outlining the proposed changes to allow the installation of solar panels as exempt development was on exhibition from 16 August until 13 September 2021.

Visit the Planning Portal for more information.

Boost mobile and internet access

The proposed changes will deliver faster and easier upgrades to telecommunications to improve mobile coverage and increase internet speed across NSW High-quality telecommunications provide greater connectivity for communities and workplaces.

The explanation of intended effect (EIE) (PDF, 223 KB) outlining the proposed changes to speed up the delivery of telecommunications as exempt development was on exhibition from 16 August until 13 September 2021.

Visit the Planning Portal for more information.

Lake Eraring Sport and Recreation Centre

Following the closure of the Myuna Bay Sport and Recreation Facility in 2019, the NSW Government is committed to delivering a new Sport and Recreation Centre to the community of Lake Macquarie.

The NSW Office of Sport proposed a preferred site for the development of a new Centre. The 17.5 hectare parcel of land is located on the northern foreshore of Lake Eraring, about 1 kilometre south-west of the closed Myuna Bay Centre.

To help streamline the delivery of a new Centre, the department proposed a change to the Infrastructure SEPP to override existing planning rules on the proposed site, so the new Centre could be assessed on the preferred site.

The new rules are likely to deliver a replacement facility within a shorter timeframe than rezoning the site via a planning proposal.

The explanation of intended effect (PDF, 614 KB) outlining the proposed changes was on exhibition from 22 October 2020 until 18 November 2020.

Visit the Planning Portal for more information.

Finalised amendments

Renewable energy and regional growth

The department has made changes to ensure renewable energy projects are built in the right places, to allow room for regional cities to grow and develop. This will safeguard vital land needed to make regional cities more liveable, while supporting the future of renewable energy.

Visit the Planning Portal for more information.

Upper Canal and Warragamba pipeline corridors

In October 2021, the NSW Government made changes to the State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007 (Infrastructure SEPP) to safeguard the Upper Canal and Warragamba Pipelines, which supply 90% of Sydney’s drinking water.

The changes ensure development applications on or adjacent to land where the canal or the pipelines exists must consider WaterNSW's Guidelines for Development Adjacent to the Upper Canal and Warragamba Pipelines (PDF, 4.2 MB).

This ensures nearby development is done carefully and appropriately, enabling the pipelines to continue to supply safe and reliable drinking water as Western Sydney grows.

Visit the Planning Portal for more information.

Health infrastructure

The delivery of critical infrastructure projects is essential to the health and wellbeing of NSW communities and supports growth in the local economy, particularly those affected by recent bushfires and the impact of COVID-19.

The department has developed a range of amendments in the Infrastructure SEPP to facilitate broader planning pathways for health services facilities, which would allow new development types and more effective delivery of developments already permitted.

The proposed amendments to the Infrastructure SEPP would make it easier for public authorities to deliver essential social infrastructure such as new facilities within existing health premises, ambulance facilities and on-site health manufacturing facilities.

The changes support the aims of the NSW Planning Reform Action Plan to ensure the efficient delivery of government infrastructure that serves the NSW community, supports community wellbeing and boosts our health industry and economy.

The Explanation of Intended Effect outlining the proposed changes was on exhibition from 20 November to 17 December 2020.

Visit the Planning Portal for more information.

Wild dog fence

A 583 km fence runs along parts of the NSW/SA and NSW/QLD borders, and is used to mitigate the impact of wild dogs to livestock and native wildlife in Western NSW.

The NSW Government has made a commitment to extend the dog fence in two sections, 420 km to the east and 322 km to the south.

An amendment has been made to the Infrastructure SEPP to clarify and streamline planning pathways for the extension and maintenance of the fence, supporting farmers and protecting native wildlife.

The amendment was gazetted on 11 December 2020. The construction of the fence extension will be subject to a separate exhibition as part of the State significant infrastructure assessment process.

Visit the Planning Portal for more information.

Interim corridor protection for Sydney Metro West and Transgrid projects

In October 2020, an amendment to the Infrastructure SEPP was made to create a short-term “protective” underground corridor related to the proposed alignment of the future Sydney Metro West project. The interim protection will avoid potential delays from impacts of other developments encroaching on the Sydney Metro West application area.

A separate minor amendment to the Infrastructure SEPP was also made to offer similar protection to Transgrid’s recently approved underground electricity transmission cable project, Powering Sydney’s Future.

More information on the Infrastructure SEPP amendments is outlined in the explanation of intended effect (PDF, 189 KB). Further information is available on the Planning Portal.

Infrastructure SEPP detailed information

Policy and maps

State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007 (on NSW legislation website).

Maps – Correctional centres (last updated September 2018)

Maps – CBD (last updated December 2017)

Maps – State sport and recreation centres (last updated December 2017)

Maps – South West (last updated February 2009)

Maps – other (last updated December 2017)

Explanatory information
Site compatibility certificates
Guidelines

Development near rail corridors and busy roads: interim guideline (PDF, 4.5 MB) (gazetted 19 December 2008) – this guideline assists in the planning, design and assessment of development in, or adjacent to, rail corridors and busy roads. It supports specific rail and road provisions of State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007.

Telecommunications

The State Environmental Planning Policy Infrastructure 2007 (SEPP Infrastructure) sets out the State wide planning provisions and development controls for telecommunication facilities in NSW.

The Infrastructure SEPP allows telecommunications infrastructure providers to be either exempt from planning approval, or be able to receive a ten-day complying development approval, for a number of telecommunications facilities subject to strict criteria including health and amenity considerations.

The NSW Telecommunications Facilities Guideline Including Broadband – July 2010 (PDF, 2.36 MB) provides further detail about the types of infrastructure that can be classified as exempt or complying development and the requirements and development standards that must be met for each facility type.

For more information on the National Broadband Network in New South Wales visit the YouCompare website.

 

Planning for Major Infrastructure Corridors

Planning for major infrastructure corridors is an important process to enable the delivery of large infrastructure projects needed in the future. Major infrastructure corridor planning can involve a number of phases over many years.

A new Planning Guideline for Major Infrastructure Corridors has been drafted to assist infrastructure agencies with the infrastructure corridor planning process. This includes:

  • preparing the right information and detail for projects.
  • an outline of when certain project information is needed.
  • guidance on planning tools and the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment’s approach to using these tools.

The Guideline specifies the planning tools infrastructure agencies can use at each stage of the corridor planning process. It is not a set of rules, however provides a suggested pathway to planning for and protecting infrastructure corridors.

View the Planning Guideline for Major Infrastructure Corridors (PDF, 1.2 MB).

Page last updated: 20/07/2022